• Train the horse to load, unload, and float quietly. This will drastically reduce the stress levels right from the start of travel. Loading is by far the most stressful single aspect of transport (other than ultra-long duration floating).
  • Make sure your preventive health program, particularly vaccinations, is up to date. Vaccinations take two to three weeks to provide protection.
  • Make sure you have the proper health records, biosecurity waivers and waybills for any regulatory requirements, especially if crossing state lines (eg. Tick spraying before entering NSW from QLD)
  • Select a horse float, gooseneck or truck that suits your horse‚Äôs size and temperament, preferably one that allows the horse to lower its head as this can make a significant difference. Make a safety checklist of the horse float, gooseneck or truck.
  • Inspect the transport vehicle for cleanliness and sanitize, if necessary.
  • If hiring a commercial transport company, make sure the grooms and other caretakers are experienced in handling horses and their care.
  • Plan the trip to minimise duration, along with any extremes in weather or environmental temperatures.
  • Ensure that the flooring remains nonslip for the entire trip. Provide absorbent bedding to help soak up any urine and manure.
  • Ensure adequate ventilation in the transport vehicle.
  • Provide a well-fitting halter; leather or webbed is ideal.
  • Bring sufficient feed and water.
  • Have an effective means of restraint.
  • Plan for rest or recovery periods. Offer water every four to six hours, or every three to four hours in hot weather. If possible, pick up manure and urine at the same time intervals.
  • Check that veterinary help is available, if required.
  • Notify the point of arrival of the journey plan and any special requirements.

Source: http://www.thehorse.com